We wish to reassure our customers we remain fully open. Canal Engineering are committed to ensure all projects are delivered on time and to the highest standard. We continue to follow all relevant official guidance, with measures in place to protect our employees, suppliers and customers.

Safety Hazards of Working At Heights

When working at a great height, there are many hazards and potential dangers to be aware of. Whilst most hazards seem obvious and preventable, 28% of all fatalities from construction in 2017 were caused by heights, meaning there are still dangers to be recognised.

From wobbly footing to unstable platforms, injuries sustained from heights can be life-impacting, even deadly in some circumstances. It’s important to be aware of all possible hazards from the ground up before beginning your project in the sky.

Falling Workers

Over 60% of all deaths at height include falls from ladders, platforms, access spaces and scaffolding, making it the most common problem facing the safety of construction workers. A fall from a height can lead to broken bones, brain damage, paralysis and death, as well as endangering other workers on the ground below.

But there are ways to lower the possibility of this happening. Extra safety measures, such as harnesses, reinforced access platforms, secured ladders and cleared ground areas can help to prevent falls from happening at dangerous heights.

ajax safe access bridging access platforms working at height

Falling Objects

A significant number of construction injuries can be contributed to falling objects from great heights during building. Workers can be injured, initially from dropping the object itself, or from being caught underneath it when it falls. Even small objects can be fatal when dropped from a height, especially if they injure the workers head or neck.

The easiest way to prevent this from happening is to secure the area below a site of open construction and to encourage all heights workers to use sacks or bags to carry equipment with them. Increased communication between workers is also crucial to alert those on all levels of falling or loose objects and to warn lower workers when work is beginning.

Poor Weather Conditions

Uncontrollable, yet dangerous; poor weather conditions when working at heights can increase the likelihood of injury or death to construction workers. Heavy winds, rain and snow can make surfaces wobbly, slippery or unsafe to stand on, making it harder for workers to keep their balance and hold onto scaffolding effectively.

Although bad weather isn’t always predictable, it’s never worth taking a chance on someone’s life. Check the forecast before sending any workers up, and ensure that you have a clear emergency rescue plan to secure them again should the weather turn dangerous.

Isolated Injuries

One of the most difficult tasks facing workers at height is the circumstances of an injury sustained, with no feasible way down to the ground. When cuts, loss of consciousness, broken bones or illnesses occur, the worker is then on a time limit to reach the ground as efficiently and safely as possible, without sustaining further injury or risking the lives of other workers.

Creating emergency plans to be put in place for even the most unlikely of situations, whether it be a direct line to the emergency services or rescue from above, could end up saving precious lives. Make sure that all workers, both on the ground and working up high, are aware and able to carry out this procedure before beginning their work.

Whilst it’s impossible to secure against every hazard, there are so many ways to protect both yourself and your workers when building at heights. By using only trusted and tested safety and security equipment, carrying out regular safety surveys and being aware of these hazards, your crew can remain as safe as possible working up high.

Call us Today

To discuss your next safe access system and receive expert advice, please contact the Ajax Technical Team; you’ll be glad you did!

Call: +44 (0) 115 986 6321 or Email Us

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5 Different Types of Loading Docks

Although all loading docks share the same basic function, their uses in specialised environments do vary. From product loading to construction support, different types of loading docks can be beneficial to different types of environments.

Flush Dock

The most common loading dock used in transport or heavy lifting, a flush dock allows for the back of the loading truck to be flush against the entryway of a space. With a secure buffer to avoid damaging the wall, the dock is parallel to the building, maintaining easy and straightforward delivery of the items and materials to be loaded. Flush docks are typically used as a space saving measure, as they fit snugly inside the chosen warehouse or building, making them ideal for smaller businesses to utilise. Generally, this type of dock is used to benefit the manufacturing industries and those with commercial outputs to deliver.

Open Dock

Although rare, and unpopular with those in the trade, Open Docks are still used today. Consisting of an open platform with very little protection against natural elements – beyond a canopy – they do not create a secure enclosure for items, making them prone to theft and damage. These docks, therefore, are rarely used for the transportation of of people or easily damaged goods. The benefit, however, of open docks is the ease of access for loaders, meaning they can save time unloading and loading through the dock.

Saw Tooth Dock

A saw tooth dock is one of the most innovative when it comes to maneuvering small outdoor spaces surrounding the designated warehouse. Uniquely shaped at an angle, they can fit easily into narrow or difficult spaces, however they can be bulky to operate within the warehouse itself – wasting valuable storage space. The industry best adapted to the Saw Tooth Dock is usually those in large scale manufacturing, with enough warehouse room to accommodate their unusual size.

Enclosed Dock

An enclosed dock is one of the most uncommon appliances used in deliveries. Allowing trucks to park indoors, aka inside a storage space or warehouse, gives loaders quick and easy to access to the supplies, however creates many problems after the delivery has been made. Vital but costly ventilation systems must be implemented to prevent the levels of exhaust fumes and pollution from impacting both the workers and the goods. These docks also take up a significant amount of room in warehouses, reducing the already limited space down, making it harder for workers to access equipment and supplies. Yet, they do have their advantages, as their enclosed form helps to protect valuable goods from environmental or structural damage.

These diverse docks all carry their own benefits and disadvantages, however can be put to effective use in different circumstances.

Call us Today

To discuss your next safe access system and receive expert advice, please contact the Ajax Technical Team; you’ll be glad you did!

Call: +44 (0) 115 986 6321 or Email Us

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